Tag Archives: literary submissions

How To Find A Literary Agent For Your Manuscript (Part Two)

Today, let’s talk about the most fun part of landing an agent – the query letter.

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Please don’t follow the example of the picture above. Above all, your query letter should be intelligible.

Your Opening Salutation

First things first, you need to start with an opening salutation. Just not any of the following:

Dear Agent:

BAD! Most agencies have several agents on staff. Find the one that most closely matches your book’s content and use their name.

Also, if no agents represent your type of material, don’t apply to that agency.

Your vampire novel will not go over well with an agent who represents literary fiction.

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Agents talk. Word can get around about unprofessional authors.

Dear Alfredo Colesono:

BAD! Some people have difficult names to spell. In my case, it’s called being of Italian descent.

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Expect an automatic rejection if you misspell an agent’s name. It’s a sign of sloppiness that will be assumed to carry over into your writing.

Hi Alfonso,

BAD! Don’t be too informal with an agent until you develop a rapport. Address them by their surname (e.g. Ms. Howell; Mr. Chan) in your query.

I’ve just written a novel that will change literature forever. And it’ll make you at least a million bucks. Only an idiot wouldn’t represent me. You’re not an idiot, are you?

BAD! A writer who toots his/her own horn only means that no one is tooting it for you. Let your work do the talking and save the grandiose statements for your mom.

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Query Letter Contents

So, what should you have in your query letter?

A pitch/synopsis of your work, usually in about two or three paragraphs.

A brief 3rd person biography with your writing credentials. If you lack writing credentials, include either interesting facts about you or your strongest accomplishments in another field.

For fiction, you’ll frequently include part of your manuscript. The number of pages requested varies, but industry standards usually range from three pages to three chapters.

A few agents will only want a query letter.

A few agents will want your whole manuscript.

Most agents (though certainly not all) will want your manuscript pasted into the body of an email.

Don’t send attachments if an agent wants your sample in the body of an email. It will be deleted unread.

Follow The Rules and Avoid the Slush Pile

To get the best results when querying an agent, make her job easy…

Or you’ll have to resign yourself to self-publishing.

And yes, there are excellent self-published works.

And yes, there are self-published works that do get recognized.

But mostly, self-publishing is a participation trophy. You’re better than that, aren’t you?

And I know some people who either have self-published or make money steering authors to self-publish will hate me for saying the previous statement.

If you Google my name and this blog, you’ll probably find a piece saying that I’m an idiot for talking smack about self-publishing.

Hey, it does work sometimes. I mean, people do win the lottery. But I wouldn’t bank on self-publishing working for you if getting a literary reputation is what you’re after.

Or if getting any financial compensation beyond a few dollars is what you’re after either…

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So, moral of the story, be nice to your agents and give them what they want!

There’s So Much More

What’s a synopsis?

How do I do a chapter outline?

Why do I need a market analysis?

What is this thing called “platform” and why do agents like authors with one?

Do I need to write a non-fiction manuscript before pitching it to agents?

I promise I’ll get into these topics in subsequent posts. Until then, write write write!

I Need All The Help I Can Get

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If you found this post entertaining or informative, please do me a solid and like and subscribe. If you’re really looking for a way to get on my good side, why not share this post on social media?

If you have any questions about landing an agent, just leave me a comment and I’ll do my best to shoot a helpful answer your way.

Fighting the good fight with you,
Alfonso

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Deal With Form Rejections

First things first, whatever you do, don’t write anything back after you receive a form rejection.

A form rejection hurts. All writers will receive them at some point in their career if they take their pursuit seriously enough to submit their work to competitive markets. Even if you’ve done the appropriate research and found an excellent match for your writing, you’ll still face form rejections. Even if you’ve polished your story, poems, or manuscript, you’ll still face form rejections. It’s the ugliest part of being in the literary game.

Whatever you do, don’t mirror that ugliness.

A form rejection doesn’t mean that you are a bad writer. Simplistic an argument as it is, know that if it did, there would not be any good writers because every writer has had to deal with form rejections at some point in their career (usually throughout). All a form rejection means is that for one reason or another, your work was not an appropriate match for the place that you submitted it to. It doesn’t mean that you don’t have talent. Read that again. It doesn’t mean that you don’t have talent. The publisher or editor is not trying to personally insult you. There are any number of considerations that go into whether a piece is accepted or passed on. The desire to insult a writer’s pride is not a consideration in any publisher, editor, or reader’s mind, so please don’t read a form rejection as such.

When the decision you’ve been waiting for from a literary magazine or publisher comes in, if it’s not to your liking, whatever you do, please don’t blast the publisher or editor. This can do serious harm to your literary reputation. At the very least, it’s the mark of a rank amateur.

Writing is like baseball. They both are slow. They both are pastoral. They both can be construed as largely solitary (compare baseball to other popular team sports…) And like baseball, if you are hitting .300, you’re doing awfully well. You’re a downright star. The point is that when you miss the mark, as you surely will, brush it off as best as you can. Once the pain of the rejection subsides, re-examine your piece. Is there anything about it that you can touch up? Are there other journals or publishers that would be a good match? Go right back out and give it your best shot. In the literary game, your degree of resiliency matters just as much as your innate talent…