Tag Archives: lena dunham

Boost Your Platform and Reap the Rewards

Every aspiring writer (and truthfully, every emerging writer) needs to be heavily involved in a writing-related project. It doesn’t matter whether it is a project that you create, or whether you latch on to an already established project; either way, you must do more than just write in order to be taken seriously in the literary game. 

The sad truth is that there are (and always will be) many talented writers who will never get their work out to the literary-inclined public. They may publish on Smashwords and generate a readership consisting of little more than family and friends. They are great writers, yet they won’t have their books discussed (dissected?) by critics. They are talented voices, yet they won’t have their books on display at The Strand. No one will read their work, regardless of what they create, because they never amassed a platform.

You already know that you need to submit your writing to literary journals and small publishers, and to connect with agents. However, if you keep getting rebuffed, even though you’re doing everything right, you need to consider your platform, or more specifically, your lack of a platform.

I think Lena Dunham is a genius. Lena Dunham received a $3.7 million advance for her new book. Why did she receive that much money? Of course, she is quite a talented writer (and actress), but the reason that she received $3.7 million for the rights to her manuscript, while many other writers would be lucky to receive $4,000, let alone publish at all, is because of her platform. She created a television show (Girls) that depicts the life of modern cosmopolitan twentysomethings in a way that has never been done before, and because of that she reaped a considerable reward from Random House.

If you are struggling as a writer, you need to analyze your platform. Who are you? What have you accomplished? Is your name is known at least within a certain niche group? If not, you need to get cracking. Create your own blog, start a literary group, become a reader for a literary magazine – just do something to get known in the sphere of writing (unless you can do something quite a bit bigger in some other sphere.)

It all comes down to platform. If you have a modicum of talent, you can write something that can get published. However, without the platform, it makes it quite a bit harder. All you have to do is get known, and all the rest will take care of itself.

Do you have any good tips for writers looking to enhance their platform? Please feel free to share them by commenting on this post.

Can’t Get Your Novel Published?

Platform. Do you know what this word refers to in conjunction with the publishing industry? Platform is the reason why Lena Dunham landed $3.7 million for her book proposal. If you want to sell a manuscript, more than the quality of your content (though it should certainly be up to snuff), you need to develop a reputation. If you’re thinking that your reputation is going to come from your book, you’ve got it backwards.

There are many ways to develop your platform. If you have public exposure in some way, you’re already set. Unfortunately, that doesn’t apply to most of us, and it can be hard to generate (I’ll leave that to others far more qualified than I am if your intent is to get famous). However, a solid portfolio of writing in other forms can do wonders for establishing a ready-made audience eager to read your book (which any publishing company would love).

A novel is a huge undertaking. I certainly think all writers should attempt one, but consider the following diverse forms as a way to gain exposure and increase your chances of selling your idea for a book:

Poetry – Whether it’s traditional or free-verse, avant-garde or transparent, there are tons of poetry journals that always are seeking quality expression.

Short Fiction/Flash Fiction – Scale back your world building and capture a photograph. That’s the art of the short story. Again, there are tons of literary magazines that are always in search of quality fiction. Regardless of your style, there’s a market for everything (of quality).

Plays – Why not write a play, send it to a contest, or work with your local theatre to have it staged?

Screenplays – Think with an eye for the visual. There are some excellent television programs and films that are quite a bit more literary than most fiction (e.g. Mad Men, my favorite program). If you want to sell your script, there’s an excellent book written by Blake Snyder called Save The Cat! that gives an insider’s view into what kind of scripts sell in Hollywood, and how to write them.

Nonfiction – Do you have expertise in a subject? It’s so easy to write an E-book and publish it on the Web. While fiction can be harder to attract an audience, with nonfiction, there’s always a built-in audience for just about every topic.

Freelance Journalism – Yes, the pay is terrible, but your name can get out there with some rather influential people.

If you need assistance with publishing your novel, please click here.